Module recap: semester two

If I thought the first semester had gone fast, the second semester went by even faster. I increased my publishing vocabulary (glossary). Found out more about typography and designers. Analysed 15 books and 2 designers. Created my own cover for Just So Stories and typeset the first 10 pages.  Typeset part of a children’s book. Woah, that layout was a…

Guest Speaker: Anna Robinette from Egmont

Anna Robinette, Junior Product Manager from Egmont, came to talk to us about her role and what it involves. Egmont publishes books for infants to young adult, fiction and non-fiction, and they’re also the number one UK publisher for children’s magazines. Egmont produces a lot of novelty products, like a Star Wars book that has…

Design module: weekly tasks

Every week we had tasks to complete in class that helped us practice using Indesign and Photoshop. Each of these tasks tested our InDesign and Photoshop skills and allowed us to get more familiar with the software. Becky Chilcott gave us very detailed exercises and it was great to be able to work through them…

CV tips from Becky Chilcott

CV tips from Becky Chilcott No typos. Say where you saw the advert. Say how you can meet the requirements with examples. Research is key. 70% is how well you fit into the job. Get business cards to match with your CV. Make your covering letter and the CV the same style.

Marketing design

Marketing design: look at everything, not just books.  Can be creative and use all sorts of materials. branding guidelines It’s important to respect branding guidelines when it comes to designing marketing materials. Companies might have certain fonts, color palettes and logos rules they want you to use that you need to carefully follow. Color palettes…

Thinking of color

Tip of the day: with images from different sources, give them the same color filter to make them look like part of a set. And on that note, to easily do that with Adobe: change your image’s colour mode to Grayscale in Photoshop place the image in Indesign click on the Direct Selection Tool select…

Think GRIDS and SPACE

River = space between words – you don’t want big gaps, want enough space to read nicely GRIDS ARE building blocks  Hyphenation: FEWER IS BETTER Grids are the hidden architecture of page layouts GOOD TEXT DESIGN l e t   y o u r  t e x t   b  r  e  a   t  …

Designing interior layouts part one

When designing a layout in InDesign, a few things to keep in mind: tick Facing Pages but leave primary text frame ticked off set it up for Print choose the correct page dimensions set up a 5mm bleed use the A-master for guides, grids, folios, running heads, etc. Anything you want repeated on each page…

Design task: cover design

This week we matched fonts to 7 different images and then choose one to make a cover out of, without editing the image and just focusing on the typeface. We had to be careful to add all the correct elements, barcode, logo, retail price, etc. This is the one I chose and the cover I…

Designing a cover – part two

Always read briefs carefully before and after and make a checklist.  Keep to deadlines.  Practice, practice, practice.  Above, three things that can get you through any assignment. ***** When designing a cover, think about composition. Overlay grids like the Fibonacci spiral on your own art. Or see if it follows the rule of thirds. Looking at…

Designer guest speaker: Ness Wood

Ness Wood, award-winning book designer, came to speak to our class today.  I wish I could have turned into a sponge to absorb everything she had to say. Ness Wood works with editors and illustrators, matching them up and making sure everything is working – it’s a collaborative process.  She works with both artwork (getting…

Designing a cover – part one

This week in class was all about getting the basics right: setting up a cover grid in InDesign. We had to consider bleeds, turnarounds, adding a slug for the fold marks. Before starting on a cover, you need to know the number of pages to determine the spine width.  And it’s good to keep in…